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P.D. Soros Fellowship for New Americans

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Gabriel Brat, 2006

MD, Stanford University

Gabriel Brat is an immigrant from Israel

Fellowship awarded to support work towards an MD in Medicine at Stanford University

GABRIEL BRAT is a surgeon at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston and the co-founder of Tissue Analytics. Previously, he was a surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland.

Gabriel is the son of Argentine immigrants.

Gabriel started his residency in surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and graduated from Stanford Medical School. He graduated with a BSE, summa cum laude, in bioengineering from Arizona State University. While at Arizona State University, Gabriel developed a diabetes treatment program for Hispanic and Native American patients from a low-income community. Most recently, he led an HIV prevention program in Central America. After graduating, he won a Marshall Scholarship, which allowed him to earn graduate degrees in Latin American studies at Oxford University and public health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Gabriel has conducted fieldwork in Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala on a variety of projects since his undergraduate years, all related to health concerns of underserved populations. Gabriel aspires to combine a career in medicine and development. He hopes to lead programs that bring together science, community involvement, and long-term philanthropic and commercial investment to improve the health of marginalized populations.

Education
  • MD Medicine | Stanford University 2008
  • MSc Latina American Studies | Oxford University 2003
  • MPH Public Health | London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 2002
  • BS Bioengineering | Arizona State University 2001
Work History
  • Surgeon, Brigham and Women's Hospital
  • Harvard Medical School, Instructor
  • Tissue Analytics, Co-Founder
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